Category Archives: Media

International Recognition for Prof Heike Ebendorff-Heidepriem!

OSA-logo-centennial-150Congratulations to Prof Heike Ebendorff-Heidepriem for being elected as a Fellow Member of The Optical Society (OSA) at the Society’s September 2017 Board of Directors meeting.
Founded in 1916, OSA is the leading professional association in optics and photonics, home to accomplished science, engineering, and business leaders from all over the world. Through world-renowned publications, meetings, and membership programs, OSA provides quality information and inspiring interactions that power achievements in the science of light.
Prof Ebendorff-Heidepriem  is being honored specially for ground breaking science contributions to the field of optical glasses and fibers.

For more information about the this honor, please click here. The list of Fellows is currently available online.

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Prof Heike Ebendorff-Heidepriem winner of 2017 Winnovation Award!

Congratulations to our Deputy Director Prof Heike Ebendorff-Heidepriem who has won the 2017 Winnovation Award  – category Technology! IPAS Deputy Director and Associate Director of the Optofab Adelaide Node of the Australian National Fabrication Facility (ANFF), Prof Ebendorff-Heidepriem has demonstrated her outstanding leadership role in the establishment of the Adelaide node of Optofab, a state-of-art glass science, fibre fabrication and 3D manufacturing research facility.

Announced on Friday 6th October,  the Winnovation Awards celebrate  the successes of female innovators changing the game in South Australia.

Heike_WinnovationSA

 

Prof Abell and team featured in NHMRC top 10 for 2016!

andrew_abell_team

Inhibitors of biotin protein ligase: A new class of antibiotic targeting Staphylococcus aureus”  led by Prof Andrew Abell and his team has been awarded 1 of the best 10 NHMRC research project 2016!

This project successfully engaged chemistry and biochemistry to discover a new antibacterial by inhibiting a key protein – known as biotin protein ligase (BPL)- as a potential mechanism for limiting bacterial survival.

Congratulations to Prof Andrew Abel and team!

IPAS Roadshow at 13th GMUSG Conference and Trade Expo

Trade showFrom 22nd – 24th August, IPAS researchers, supported by ATSE, represented the University of Adelaide at the 13th Global Maintenance Upper Spencer Gulf (GMUSG) Conference and Trade Expo at Whyalla. GMUSG was established to promote the Upper Spencer Gulf as a regional centre of excellence in the provision of “maintenance services” to the local, national and international resource processing sector.

Alongside with UniSA and Flinders Uni, Dr Stephen Warren-Smith had a talk to promote collaboration between industry and universities. Of particular interest to attendees were the high temperature sensors and 3D printers; with ABC Eyre Peninsula following up with Stephen on the 25th for a short radio interview with Deane Williams to discuss IPAS’ work with SJ Cheesman at the Nyrstar multi-metals recovery plant.

Future of Photonics Innovation – finalist in 2017 Australian Financial Review Higher Education Awards!

TrajanThe Future of Photonics Innovation – The Trajan Scientific and Medical (Trajan) – The University of Adelaide strategic partnership lead by Prof Heike Ebendorff-Heidepriem  claims one of the top higher education achievers in 2017 AFR Review Higher Education Awards!

This prestigious awards, in their third year, recognise innovation and achievement in Australia’s higher education sector.  The winners will be announced and honoured at a sumptuous Gala Dinner, presented by UniSuper, on 29 August 7pm.

 

Dragonflies and Driveless Cars

Dragonfly

Despite the fact that dragonflies can’t drive cars, understanding how their brains work is improving selective attention for artificial vision systems, for applications such as driveless cars.

A recent study by Dr Steven Wiederman and published in eLife, demonstrated how dragonflies are highly efficient predators due to the highly complex nature of their brain. Specifically, cells in their brains, called Small Target Motion Detectors, can predict the direction and location of its prey.

Further understanding of such complex neurological systems can be applied to autonomous robots and driverless cars.

Articles:

Wiederman SD, Fabian JM, Dunbier JR & O-Carroll (2017) A Predictive Focus of Gain Modulation Encodes Target Trajectories in Insect Vision, eLife, 25th July, DOI: 10.7554/eLife.26478.002

Bagheri ZM, Cazzolato BS, Grainger S, O’Carroll DC & Wiederman SD (2017) An Autonomous Robot Inspired by Insect Neurphysiology Purses Moving Features in Natural Environments, Journal of Neural Engineering,13 July, DOI: 10.1088/1741-2552/aa776c

University of Adelaide media release

How the Dragonfly’s Surprisingly Complex Brain Makes it a Deadly Hunter, Gizmodo

Dragonfly Brains Have ‘Killer Cells’ That Can Predict the Movement of Their Victims – and It Could Lead To Robot Supervision, the Daily Mail

Dragonfly Brains Predict the Path of Their Prey, Science Daily

Media Release: Designing Better Drugs to Treat Type 2 Diabetes

John Bruning

Research led by the University of Adelaide is paving the way for safer and more effective drugs to treat type 2 diabetes, reducing side effects and the need for insulin injections.

Two studies, published in the Journal of Medicinal Chemistry and BBA-General Subjects, have shown for the first time how new potential anti-diabetic drugs interact with their target in the body at the molecular level.

These new potential drugs have a completely different action than the most commonly prescribed anti-diabetic, Metformin, which acts on the liver to reduce glucose production, and are potentially more efficient at reducing blood sugar. They target a protein receptor known as PPARgamma found in fat tissue throughout the body, either fully or partially activating it in order to lower blood sugar by increasing sensitivity to insulin and changing the metabolism of fat and sugar.

“Type two diabetes is characterised by resistance to insulin with subsequent high blood sugar which leads to serious disease. It is usually associated with poor lifestyle factors such as diet and lack of exercise,” says lead researcher Dr John Bruning, with the University’s School of Biological Sciences and Institute for Photonics and Advanced Sensing.

“Prevalence of type 2 diabetes in Australia alone has more than tripled since 1990, with an estimated cost of $6 billion a year. The development of safe and more efficient therapeutics is therefore becoming increasingly important.

“People with severe diabetes need to take insulin but having to inject this can be problematic, and it’s difficult to get insulin levels just right. It’s highly desirable for people to come off insulin injections and instead use oral therapeutics.”

The first study, in collaboration with The Scripps Research Institute in Florida, US, describes an honours research project by Rebecca Frkic, where 14 different versions of a drug which partially activates PPARgamma were produced. Partial activation can have the benefit of fewer side-effects than full activation.

The original drug, INT131, is currently being tested in clinical trials in the US but some of the versions produced at the University of Adelaide have increased potency compared to the original, with the potential to further improve the treatment of type 2 diabetes.

“A major finding of this study was being able to show which regions of the drug are most important for interacting with the PPARgamma receptor,” says Dr Bruning. “This means we now have the information to design modified drugs which will work even more efficiently.”

The second study, in collaboration with Flinders University, used X-ray crystallography to demonstrate for the first time exactly how a potential new drug, rivoglitazone, binds with the PPARgamma receptor. Rivoglitazone fully activates PPARgamma but has less side effects than others with this mode of action.

“Showing how this compound interacts with its target is a key step towards being able to design new therapeutics with higher efficiencies and less side-effects,” says lead author Dr Rajapaksha, from Flinders University School of Medicine (now at La Trobe University). “Lack of structural information was hampering determination of the precise mechanisms involved.”

Press Release link.

Reference: Frkic et al (2017) “Structure-Activity Relationship of 2,4-dichloro-N-(3,5-dichloro-4-(quinolin-3-yloxy)phenyl)benzenesulfonamide (INT131) Analogs for PPARγ-Targeted Antidiabetics” Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, doi: 10.1021/acs.jmedchem.6b01727.

Rajapaksha et al (2017) “X-ray Crystal Structure of Rivoglitazone bound to PPARγ and PPAR Subtype Selectivity of TZDs” Biochimica et Biophysica Acta (BBA) – General Subjects, doi:10.1016/j.bbagen.2017.05.008.

Uni of Adelaide to Partner Mitsubishi for Sensing Solutions

The University of Adelaide will develop novel very high temperature sensors for global industrial giant Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, the University announced today.

Mitsubishi Heavy Industries and the University have signed contracts for collaborative research by the University’s Institute for Photonics and Advanced Sensing (IPAS) to develop unique optical fibre based ultra-high, multipoint temperature sensors that will enhance the efficiency of their power generation systems.

IPAS and the University’s School of Physical Sciences are renowned for the development of light-based technologies, including optical fibre sensors, for a range of biomedical, defence, environmental and industrial sensing.

“Mitsubishi came to Adelaide looking for global research partners and decided our ultra-high temperature optical fibre sensors would provide a unique opportunity to better understand and improve their world leading power generation systems,” says Professor Mike Brooks, Acting Vice-Chancellor and President at the University of Adelaide.

“The University of Adelaide is honoured to be working with such a giant of industrial engineering and manufacturing as Mitsubishi Heavy Industries.”

Last year IPAS worked with 68 different local and international companies to develop novel breakthrough technologies to help them improve manufacturing and business processes.

“Application of IPAS technologies to date has been largely focused on local South Australian companies – helping them grow their business and retain jobs,” says Professor Andre Luiten, Director of IPAS.

“This new collaboration represents international recognition for the quality of the research and development we are doing, and the difference these emerging disruptive technologies like photonics can make to businesses’ bottom lines.”

“This new collaboration surely brings new technology to sensing of the hot parts of the product of MHI. This will lead to improvements in our product power, and a new business opportunity,” says Dr Fukagawa, the general manager of the heat transfer research department, from Mitsubishi Heavy Industries.

The Mitsubishi contract will build on the technology that IPAS developed with SJ Cheesman for deployment at the Nyrstar Polymetalic Smelter at Port Pirie. This provided novel temperature sensors that can withstand furnace temperatures, enabling processes within the environment of the smelter to be monitored for the first time enabling increased efficiency and significant reductions in energy use

“Cool” Front Cover Feature for the Sapphire Clock

Cryo clock

The Sapphire Clock is featured on the front cover of this month’s “Cold Facts”, the official publication of the Cryogenic Society of America

The Sapphire Clock is a cryogenic sapphire oscillator that allows time to be measured to the femtosecond scale (one quadrillionth of a second), the kind of accuracy required for ultra high precision measurements; such as radar technology, long baseline astronomy and quantum computing.

Building off technology developed by Prof Andre Luiten in 1996 and Prof John Hartnett in 2004-2012, the most recent version of the Sapphire Clock is capable of 100 time better spectral purity than other sapphire clock articlecommercially available technologies.

The Sapphire Clock team is led by A/Prof Martin O’Connor and a commercial version will be available in late 2017.

Ref: O’Connor et al (2017) Cold Facts, Vol 33 (1): 16-17.

New optical fibre sensor to aid breast cancer surgery

An IPAS research team led by Dr Erik Schartner has developed an optical fibre probe that distinguishes breast cancer tissue from normal tissue – potentially allowing surgeons to be much more precise when removing breast cancer.

The device could help prevent follow-up surgery, currently needed for 15-20% of breast cancer surgery patients where all the cancer is not removed.

Published today in the journal Cancer Research, the researchers in the ARC Centre of Excellence for Nanoscale BioPhotonics (CNBP), the Institute for Photonics and Advanced Sensing, and the Schools of Physical Sciences and Medicine, describe how the optical probe works by detecting the difference in pH between the two types of tissue. The research conducted with our partners Prof. Grantley Gill at with the Breast, Endocrine and Surgical Oncology Unit at the Royal Adelaide Hospital, Dr Deepak Dhatrak of SA Pathology and Prof David Callen, Director of the Centre for Personalised Cancer Medicine at the University of Adelaide. 

dr-erik-schartner

“We have designed and tested a fibre-tip pH probe that has very high sensitivity for differentiating between healthy and cancerous tissue with an extremely simple – so far experimental – setup that is fully portable,” says project leader Dr Erik Schartner, postdoctoral researcher at the CNBP at the University of Adelaide.

“Because it is cost-effective to do measurements in this manner compared to many other medical technologies, we see a clear scope for this technology in operating theaters.”

Current surgical techniques to remove cancer lack a reliable method to identify the tissue type during surgery, relying on the experience and judgement of the surgeon to decide on how much tissue to remove. Because of this, surgeons often perform ‘cavity shaving’, which can result in the removal of excessive healthy tissue. And at other times, some cancerous tissue will be left behind.

“This is quite traumatic to the patient, and has been shown to have long-term detrimental effects on the patient’s outcome,” Dr Schartner says.

The optical fibre probe uses the principle that cancer tissue has a more acidic environment than normal cells; they produce more lactic acid as a byproduct of their aggressive growth.

The pH indicator embedded in the tip of the optical probe emits a different colour of light depending on the acidity. A miniature spectrometer on the other end of the probe analyses the light and therefore the pH.

“How we see it working is the surgeon using the probe to test questionable tissue during surgery,” says Dr Schartner. “If the readout shows the tissues are cancerous, that can immediately be removed. Presently this normally falls to post-operative pathology, which could mean further surgery.

The researchers currently have a portable demonstration unit and are doing further testing. They hope to progress to clinical studies in the near future.