Category Archives: ipas

helps boosts search rank for ‘ipas’

Future of Photonics Innovation – finalist in 2017 Australian Financial Review Higher Education Awards!

TrajanThe Future of Photonics Innovation – The Trajan Scientific and Medical (Trajan) – The University of Adelaide strategic partnership lead by Prof Heike Ebendorff-Heidepriem  claims one of the top higher education achievers in 2017 AFR Review Higher Education Awards!

This prestigious awards, in their third year, recognise innovation and achievement in Australia’s higher education sector.  The winners will be announced and honoured at a sumptuous Gala Dinner, presented by UniSuper, on 29 August 7pm.

 

Eureka! Sapphire Clock Finalist in the Eureka Prize

SC

The Sapphire Clock team, led by Professor Andre Luiten, is one of two finalists in the “Outstanding Science in Safeguarding Australia” category the Australian Museum Eureka Prize.

Over the last 20 years, the Sapphire Clock team, including Professor Andre Luiten, A/Professor John Hartnett and A/Professor Martin O’Connor has developed a high-precision technology that generates signals of the ultimate purity. The Sapphire Clock is a cryogenic sapphire oscillator that allows time to be measured to the femtosecond scale (one quadrillionth of a second), with only a single second gained or lost every 40 million years. This kind of accuracy is required for ultra-high precision measurements.

Their work was motivated out of a belief that precision measurement is the path to discovering new knowledge – a foundation belief of all science – however, this capability also delivers a competitive advantage to industry by allowing one to measure what was previously thought to be immeasurable.

Recently, the Sapphire Clock team initiated a collaboration the Jindalee Over-The-Horizon Radar Network (JORN) with the Sapphire Clock having applications to improve radar technology. JORN is a linchpin of Australia’s security, providing long-range, broad-scale and continuous surveillance. The sapphire clock technology offers a step-change in the performance of this radar, which has been likened to getting 30 years of development in just one day. This combination of leading technologies opens a path to improved security for all Australians

“By combining two decades of pioneering research with cutting-edge engineering, the Sapphire Clock Team’s technology offers the potential for a step change in the performance of the Jindalee Over-The-Horizon Radar Network, a vital Australian defence asset. The Sapphire Clock offers a thousandfold improvement in timing precision, helping Australian defence agencies identify threats to the nation”

 

Additional links:

Finalists video

Australian Museum media release

 

When Photonics Meets Art

Thank you to Karen Cunningham and the Jam Factory team for hosting Deputy Director Heike Ebendorff-Heidepriem, Tim Zhao, Yunle Wei and Mel McDowall. The team added their own spin to paper weights and glass making and are eager to see the finished products!

This was the initial stages of a collaboration between the Jam Factory and CNBP, to create glass art incorporating nano-particles.

pH Probe for Cancer Diagnostics One Step Closer to Clinical Trials

A probe, developed within IPAS and the ARC Centre of Excellence for Nanoscale BioPhotonics (CNBP), that allows the real-time detection of differences in pH (indicative of healthy vs. cancer tissue) was featured in Flinders University news.

Funding from the State Government’s Medical Technologies Program has allowed a team involving Dr Erik Schartner, Prof Mark Hutchinson, Prof Grantley Gill and Dr Elizaveta Klantsataya to work with biomedical engineers within Flinders University’s Medical Device Partnering Program (MDPP) to bring the technology one step closer to clinical trials.

More information can be found on the Flinders University news page.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

ARC Future Fellowship for Dr Jonathan George

jonathan georgeCongratulations to Dr Jonathan George on receiving an Australian Research Council (ARC) Future Fellowship.

Jonathan will be using marine microorganisms to study the biosynthesis of usual antibiotic products, hopefully resulting in the creation of new antibiotics. Currently a senior lecturer in the School of Chemistry,  Jonathan will receive $820 000 for salary and research support over a four year period.

 

Project details: 

“Using natural products to inspire discoveries in synthesis and biosynthesis. This project aims to understand the organic chemistry that occurs in the biosynthesis of unusual antibiotic natural products by marine microorganisms. In an interdisciplinary approach, proposed biosynthetic intermediates will be synthesized and screened against newly isolated enzymes from the microorganisms of interest. This will allow the elucidation of biosynthetic pathways, and aid the discovery of new chemoenzymatic reactivity that may be broadly useful in organic synthesis. Non-enzymatic, predisposed organic reactions will also be uncovered during the project. The benefit of this project will be an improvement in our ability to synthesise potential antibiotics using a combined synthetic organic and chemoenzymatic approach. This could lead to useful new antibiotics in the future.”

ARC Future Fellowships are aimed at allowing outstanding mid-career researchers to stay in Australia and encourage research in areas of national priority.

A comprehensive list of other successful Future Fellowships can be found here.

Prof Luiten: New Appointment to the National Committee for Physics

Prof Andre Luiten has been appointedAAS as a member of the National Committee for Physics (NCP), with tenure until 31st March 2020. The NCP is one of 22 national committees within the Australian Academy of Science(AAS), with the broad aim of fostering links between domestic and international scientists within disciplines to the academy.

 

 

Photonics at Science Meets Parliament 2017

Professor Heike Ebendorff-Heidepriem represented the ARC Centre of Excellence for Nanoscale BioPhotonics and IPAS at Science Meets Parliament, held in Canberra on 21-22nd March 2017. 

Science Meets Parliament is an annual event run by Science and Technology Australia and provides ~200 scientists with the opportunity to meet with federal politicians, advisors and policy makers.

Heike had the opportunity to meet with Senator Chris Back, Chair of Foreign Affairs, Defence and Trade Legislative Committee, and Senator Chris Ketter; discussing her research involving the use of optical fibres to create windows into the body, specifically in regards to pain detection.

In addition, Heike also had the opportunity to talk with the Honourable Richard Marles, Shadow Minister for Defence, during the official dinner.

A summary of Science Meets Parliament can be found here.

SMP2017

Top 100 Articles of 2016

Screen Shot 2017-03-30 at 9.47.27 pm

The publication “Fast machine-learning online optimisation of ultra-cold-atom experiments” was ranked in the top 100 articles published in Scientific Reports in 2016, receiving 11820 views.

The paper was the result of a collaboration between Australian National University and Professor Andre Luiten.

Scientific Reports is part of the Nature publishing group and more than 20000 articles were published in 2016.

prof-andre-luiten-ctd

Reference: Wigley et al (2016) “Fast Machine-Learning Online Optimization of Ultra-Cold-Atom Experiments” Scientific Reports, 6, 25890. doi:10.1038/srep25890

New optical fibre sensor to aid breast cancer surgery

An IPAS research team led by Dr Erik Schartner has developed an optical fibre probe that distinguishes breast cancer tissue from normal tissue – potentially allowing surgeons to be much more precise when removing breast cancer.

The device could help prevent follow-up surgery, currently needed for 15-20% of breast cancer surgery patients where all the cancer is not removed.

Published today in the journal Cancer Research, the researchers in the ARC Centre of Excellence for Nanoscale BioPhotonics (CNBP), the Institute for Photonics and Advanced Sensing, and the Schools of Physical Sciences and Medicine, describe how the optical probe works by detecting the difference in pH between the two types of tissue. The research conducted with our partners Prof. Grantley Gill at with the Breast, Endocrine and Surgical Oncology Unit at the Royal Adelaide Hospital, Dr Deepak Dhatrak of SA Pathology and Prof David Callen, Director of the Centre for Personalised Cancer Medicine at the University of Adelaide. 

dr-erik-schartner

“We have designed and tested a fibre-tip pH probe that has very high sensitivity for differentiating between healthy and cancerous tissue with an extremely simple – so far experimental – setup that is fully portable,” says project leader Dr Erik Schartner, postdoctoral researcher at the CNBP at the University of Adelaide.

“Because it is cost-effective to do measurements in this manner compared to many other medical technologies, we see a clear scope for this technology in operating theaters.”

Current surgical techniques to remove cancer lack a reliable method to identify the tissue type during surgery, relying on the experience and judgement of the surgeon to decide on how much tissue to remove. Because of this, surgeons often perform ‘cavity shaving’, which can result in the removal of excessive healthy tissue. And at other times, some cancerous tissue will be left behind.

“This is quite traumatic to the patient, and has been shown to have long-term detrimental effects on the patient’s outcome,” Dr Schartner says.

The optical fibre probe uses the principle that cancer tissue has a more acidic environment than normal cells; they produce more lactic acid as a byproduct of their aggressive growth.

The pH indicator embedded in the tip of the optical probe emits a different colour of light depending on the acidity. A miniature spectrometer on the other end of the probe analyses the light and therefore the pH.

“How we see it working is the surgeon using the probe to test questionable tissue during surgery,” says Dr Schartner. “If the readout shows the tissues are cancerous, that can immediately be removed. Presently this normally falls to post-operative pathology, which could mean further surgery.

The researchers currently have a portable demonstration unit and are doing further testing. They hope to progress to clinical studies in the near future.

$14.7 million in grants to further drive innovative defence technologies

Minister for Defence Industry, The Hon Christopher Pyne MP today announced seven Australian organisations would receive Australian Government funding of $14.7 million to develop and demonstrate innovative technologies to enhance Defence capability, as part of the Government’s $1.6 billion investment in defence innovation.

https://www.pyneonline.com.au/media-centre/media-releases/147-million-in-grants-to-further-drive-innovative-defence-technologies

IPAS researchers Prof Andre Luiten, A/Prof John Hartnett and A/Prof Martin O’Connor are the research leaders of one of these projects. Their project is to develop Ultra-High Quality Signal Generation for Over the Horizon Radar. The project aims to upgrade the overall performance of the Jindalee Operational Radar Network (JORN), through a performance upgrade of its essential sub-systems. This will improve overall detection of targets.

prof-andre-luiten-ctd