Category Archives: CommercialNews

Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Visit

IPAS researcher Dr Stephen Warren-Smith and project manager, Tim Nelson recently visited Mitsubishi Heavy Industry (MHI) in Nagasaki, Japan.

During the visit, Stephen and Tim met with MHI staff to discuss the progression  of the high temperature fibre sensor project, including delivery of the first prototype.

Included in the visit was a tour of the Mitsubishi History Museum,  with Research Managers Mr Kohei Kawazoe and Mr Shigenari Horie acting as excellent tour guides.

Overall,  the visit was positive, well received and the project continues to make excellent progress against its milestones.

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Kohei Kawazoe, Tim Nelson, Shigenari Horie and Stephen Warren-Smith at the Mitsubishi History Museum.

Trajan Named in Top 20 “Businesses of Tomorrow” List

Screen Shot 2017-04-12 at 3.50.55 pmTrajan Scientific and Medical (Trajan) has been named one of the top 20 leading “Businesses of Tomorrow” in Australia.

Commissioned by Westpac and conducted by Deloitte, the Businesses of Tomorrow study identified companies that are shaping Australia’s future. Judging criteria included: track record of delivery, ability to meet future challenges and contribution to the community, industry or economy.

Trajan‘s strong collaborative relationship with researchers, such as IPAS within the University of Adelaide, allowing the company to be at the forefront of innovation, was a contributing factor in gaining a place in the top 20 list.  Furthermore, Trajan’s evolution from an engineering business to market-focused company allows Trajan to “remain agile and adaptable to market needs”.

A branch of Trajan has been colocated with IPAS since September 2016, following the Photonics Catalyst Program, a joint initiative between the South Australian government and IPAS to connect industry with research.

A full report on the top 200 Australian Businesses of Tomorrow can be found here.

Uni of Adelaide to Partner Mitsubishi for Sensing Solutions

The University of Adelaide will develop novel very high temperature sensors for global industrial giant Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, the University announced today.

Mitsubishi Heavy Industries and the University have signed contracts for collaborative research by the University’s Institute for Photonics and Advanced Sensing (IPAS) to develop unique optical fibre based ultra-high, multipoint temperature sensors that will enhance the efficiency of their power generation systems.

IPAS and the University’s School of Physical Sciences are renowned for the development of light-based technologies, including optical fibre sensors, for a range of biomedical, defence, environmental and industrial sensing.

“Mitsubishi came to Adelaide looking for global research partners and decided our ultra-high temperature optical fibre sensors would provide a unique opportunity to better understand and improve their world leading power generation systems,” says Professor Mike Brooks, Acting Vice-Chancellor and President at the University of Adelaide.

“The University of Adelaide is honoured to be working with such a giant of industrial engineering and manufacturing as Mitsubishi Heavy Industries.”

Last year IPAS worked with 68 different local and international companies to develop novel breakthrough technologies to help them improve manufacturing and business processes.

“Application of IPAS technologies to date has been largely focused on local South Australian companies – helping them grow their business and retain jobs,” says Professor Andre Luiten, Director of IPAS.

“This new collaboration represents international recognition for the quality of the research and development we are doing, and the difference these emerging disruptive technologies like photonics can make to businesses’ bottom lines.”

“This new collaboration surely brings new technology to sensing of the hot parts of the product of MHI. This will lead to improvements in our product power, and a new business opportunity,” says Dr Fukagawa, the general manager of the heat transfer research department, from Mitsubishi Heavy Industries.

The Mitsubishi contract will build on the technology that IPAS developed with SJ Cheesman for deployment at the Nyrstar Polymetalic Smelter at Port Pirie. This provided novel temperature sensors that can withstand furnace temperatures, enabling processes within the environment of the smelter to be monitored for the first time enabling increased efficiency and significant reductions in energy use

New optical fibre sensor to aid breast cancer surgery

An IPAS research team led by Dr Erik Schartner has developed an optical fibre probe that distinguishes breast cancer tissue from normal tissue – potentially allowing surgeons to be much more precise when removing breast cancer.

The device could help prevent follow-up surgery, currently needed for 15-20% of breast cancer surgery patients where all the cancer is not removed.

Published today in the journal Cancer Research, the researchers in the ARC Centre of Excellence for Nanoscale BioPhotonics (CNBP), the Institute for Photonics and Advanced Sensing, and the Schools of Physical Sciences and Medicine, describe how the optical probe works by detecting the difference in pH between the two types of tissue. The research conducted with our partners Prof. Grantley Gill at with the Breast, Endocrine and Surgical Oncology Unit at the Royal Adelaide Hospital, Dr Deepak Dhatrak of SA Pathology and Prof David Callen, Director of the Centre for Personalised Cancer Medicine at the University of Adelaide. 

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“We have designed and tested a fibre-tip pH probe that has very high sensitivity for differentiating between healthy and cancerous tissue with an extremely simple – so far experimental – setup that is fully portable,” says project leader Dr Erik Schartner, postdoctoral researcher at the CNBP at the University of Adelaide.

“Because it is cost-effective to do measurements in this manner compared to many other medical technologies, we see a clear scope for this technology in operating theaters.”

Current surgical techniques to remove cancer lack a reliable method to identify the tissue type during surgery, relying on the experience and judgement of the surgeon to decide on how much tissue to remove. Because of this, surgeons often perform ‘cavity shaving’, which can result in the removal of excessive healthy tissue. And at other times, some cancerous tissue will be left behind.

“This is quite traumatic to the patient, and has been shown to have long-term detrimental effects on the patient’s outcome,” Dr Schartner says.

The optical fibre probe uses the principle that cancer tissue has a more acidic environment than normal cells; they produce more lactic acid as a byproduct of their aggressive growth.

The pH indicator embedded in the tip of the optical probe emits a different colour of light depending on the acidity. A miniature spectrometer on the other end of the probe analyses the light and therefore the pH.

“How we see it working is the surgeon using the probe to test questionable tissue during surgery,” says Dr Schartner. “If the readout shows the tissues are cancerous, that can immediately be removed. Presently this normally falls to post-operative pathology, which could mean further surgery.

The researchers currently have a portable demonstration unit and are doing further testing. They hope to progress to clinical studies in the near future.

$14.7 million in grants to further drive innovative defence technologies

Minister for Defence Industry, The Hon Christopher Pyne MP today announced seven Australian organisations would receive Australian Government funding of $14.7 million to develop and demonstrate innovative technologies to enhance Defence capability, as part of the Government’s $1.6 billion investment in defence innovation.

https://www.pyneonline.com.au/media-centre/media-releases/147-million-in-grants-to-further-drive-innovative-defence-technologies

IPAS researchers Prof Andre Luiten, A/Prof John Hartnett and A/Prof Martin O’Connor are the research leaders of one of these projects. Their project is to develop Ultra-High Quality Signal Generation for Over the Horizon Radar. The project aims to upgrade the overall performance of the Jindalee Operational Radar Network (JORN), through a performance upgrade of its essential sub-systems. This will improve overall detection of targets.

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$4.5 million awarded for new research discoveries

IPAS researchers have today been awarded $4.5 million in federal funding for new research.

This included 4 Discovery Projects, 1 DECRA Fellowship, 1 Future Fellowship and 2 LIEF infrastructure grants led by IPAS members. 

IPAS Partnership with Trajan Video

Prof Andrew Abell and team at Calpain Therepeutics win $100,000 Business Prize

Prof Andrew Abell of IPAS and the team at Calpain Therapeutics who are commercialising a drug which has the potential to delay cataracts from forming, and slow their growth, have been named the 2011 winners of The University of Queensland (UQ) Business School’s $100,000 ENTERPRIZE competition.

Calpain Therapeutics co-founders Dr Tim Lovell and Prof Andrew Abell, with team member Dr Victoria Kopetz, accepted the winner’s cheque last night after a final business pitch to the Enterprize judges at Pitch Day, held at the Brisbane Powerhouse.

Dr Lovell said the Calpain Therapeutics team was “thrilled to have won such a prestigious competition as Enterprize” – especially on what was World Sight Day (a global initiative to raise public awareness of blindness and vision impairment as major public health issues).

Calpain Therapeutics acknowledge key contributions from a large team in New
Zealand where Prof Abell worked prior to moving to Adelaide, The University of Canterbury (Jim Coxon), Lincoln University (James Morton and Roy Bickerstaffe) and Douglas Pharmaceuticals.

Many congratulations to Prof Andrew Abell and team on this excellent result.

Read the full article in the News Maker.

Social Media for Serious Scientists

Listen a recording of “Social Media for Serious Scientists” given by Mr Mike Seyfang to the IPAS research group at the weekly optics and photonics seminar series.

In the words of IPAS Director Professor Tanya Monro from Twitter during the presentation “Listening to @fang tell the “serious scientists” in #ipas why we need to engage with social media”

View more webinars from Mike Seyfang.

For more information about visit his weblog or website: