Quantifying the rate and depth dependence of bioturbation based on optically-stimulated luminescence (OSL) dates and meteoric 10Be

Prof Nigel Spooner

Prof Nigel Spooner

We have studied “bioturbation” (mixing by animals, plants and insects) of a soil from northeast Queensland using “Optical Dating”, a technique that measures how long ago individual grains of soil were last exposed to sunlight. We show for the first time how mixing rate and depth are related in a bioturbated soil, which is important because these both much affect soil fertility.

Authors: Johnson, MO, Mudd, SM, Pillans, B, Spooner, NA, Keith Fifield, L., Kirkby, MJ, Gloor, M

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Work done in collaboration with ANU, University of Leeds, University of Edinburgh

Earth Surface Processes and Landforms 39 (9) 1188–1196 (2014)

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Posted on July 16, 2014, in IPASnews, Paper Summaries and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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