Future of Photonics Innovation – finalist in 2017 Australian Financial Review Higher Education Awards!

TrajanThe Future of Photonics Innovation – The Trajan Scientific and Medical (Trajan) – The University of Adelaide strategic partnership lead by Prof Heike Ebendorff-Heidepriem  claims one of the top higher education achievers in 2017 AFR Review Higher Education Awards!

This prestigious awards, in their third year, recognise innovation and achievement in Australia’s higher education sector.  The winners will be announced and honoured at a sumptuous Gala Dinner, presented by UniSuper, on 29 August 7pm.

 

NEW LIGHT SCIENCE SPECTACULAR

Big Science in Adelaide forefront and new light science. From nanoscale biophotonics to better understanding the of universe. The hidden science of light will also be revealed in live and interactive demonstrations and audience-stage interaction using WiFi and phone-cameras to see the IR light.

When: Monday, August 14 2017. 6:30 PM to 9:00 PM
Where: Braggs Lecture Theatre University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA, 5005
Topic: Energy and transport, Environment and nature, Health and medical, Space and astronomy, Innovation and technology
Cost: Free
Bookings: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/new-light-science-spectacular-tickets-36679331869

As part of Big Science in Adelaide, we invite you to a science arena of stunning spectaculars and exciting discoveries.

All content of this event is selected from forefront and new light science to resonate with the theme. The scale of topics is far-reaching, from that in the field of nanoscale biophotonics (Prof Heike Ebendorff-Heidepriem from ARC Centre of Excellence for Nanoscale BioPhotonics, University of Adelaide) to better understanding the of universe (Dr Madakbas, physicist (photonics), whose company builds night vision sensors for NASA and Hubble Space Telescope). Apart from the most invisible, the hidden science of light will also be revealed (Miroslav Kostecki, Technical Manager at eLabtronics, Adelaide) in live and interactive demonstrations.

The highlight will be the audience-stage interaction component: audience is invited to control the large colour light ribbons on stage via mobile phone using WiFi and use their phone-cameras to see the IR light.

The event will end with the engaging activity of “Many Hands Make Light Work” to recognize the significance of advancing science: achieving Zero Net Carbon and protecting the planet (Dr Yunus, Nobel Peace Prize Winner).

University of Adelaide “royalty” visits IPAS

Today we were delighted to host Rachel Bragg, the great great granddaughter of William Henry Bragg and the great granddaughter of William “Lawrence” Bragg. Not only did William and Lawrence win the Nobel Prize in 1915 for the X-ray crystallography, but both are the namesakes of our building.

Rachel and her husband toured the Braggs laboratories, received a brief tour of the University campus, saw the UNiversity’s collection of equipment from the Bragg’s laboratory and lastly, saw the busts of both William and Lawrence, twins of busts that are located in the Royal Institute of Great Britain.

 

The Braggs” were the only father-son team to win a Nobel Prize and Lawrence is the youngest recipient, at 25 years old. William Bragg was the Elder Professor of Mathematics and Experimental Physics at the University of Adelaide between 1885-1908. Lawrence was born in Adelaide in 1890 and was a student of the University until 1908, studying mathematics, chemistry and physics.

Measuring up!

ProBarry Inglis Medalfessor Andre Luiten was honoured today by the National Measurement Institute as he received the 2017 Barry Inglis Medal.

Presented by Dr Barry Inglis PSM himself, the medal recognises outstanding achievement in measurement research and excellence in practical measurements.

Dr Inglis is the president of the international body that defines the units and measurement scales for science (CIPM) and was the first CEO of the National Measurement Institute.

Eureka! Sapphire Clock Finalist in the Eureka Prize

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The Sapphire Clock team, led by Professor Andre Luiten, is one of two finalists in the “Outstanding Science in Safeguarding Australia” category the Australian Museum Eureka Prize.

Over the last 20 years, the Sapphire Clock team, including Professor Andre Luiten, A/Professor John Hartnett and A/Professor Martin O’Connor has developed a high-precision technology that generates signals of the ultimate purity. The Sapphire Clock is a cryogenic sapphire oscillator that allows time to be measured to the femtosecond scale (one quadrillionth of a second), with only a single second gained or lost every 40 million years. This kind of accuracy is required for ultra-high precision measurements.

Their work was motivated out of a belief that precision measurement is the path to discovering new knowledge – a foundation belief of all science – however, this capability also delivers a competitive advantage to industry by allowing one to measure what was previously thought to be immeasurable.

Recently, the Sapphire Clock team initiated a collaboration the Jindalee Over-The-Horizon Radar Network (JORN) with the Sapphire Clock having applications to improve radar technology. JORN is a linchpin of Australia’s security, providing long-range, broad-scale and continuous surveillance. The sapphire clock technology offers a step-change in the performance of this radar, which has been likened to getting 30 years of development in just one day. This combination of leading technologies opens a path to improved security for all Australians

“By combining two decades of pioneering research with cutting-edge engineering, the Sapphire Clock Team’s technology offers the potential for a step change in the performance of the Jindalee Over-The-Horizon Radar Network, a vital Australian defence asset. The Sapphire Clock offers a thousandfold improvement in timing precision, helping Australian defence agencies identify threats to the nation”

 

Additional links:

Finalists video

Australian Museum media release

 

Dragonflies and Driveless Cars

Dragonfly

Despite the fact that dragonflies can’t drive cars, understanding how their brains work is improving selective attention for artificial vision systems, for applications such as driveless cars.

A recent study by Dr Steven Wiederman and published in eLife, demonstrated how dragonflies are highly efficient predators due to the highly complex nature of their brain. Specifically, cells in their brains, called Small Target Motion Detectors, can predict the direction and location of its prey.

Further understanding of such complex neurological systems can be applied to autonomous robots and driverless cars.

Articles:

Wiederman SD, Fabian JM, Dunbier JR & O-Carroll (2017) A Predictive Focus of Gain Modulation Encodes Target Trajectories in Insect Vision, eLife, 25th July, DOI: 10.7554/eLife.26478.002

Bagheri ZM, Cazzolato BS, Grainger S, O’Carroll DC & Wiederman SD (2017) An Autonomous Robot Inspired by Insect Neurphysiology Purses Moving Features in Natural Environments, Journal of Neural Engineering,13 July, DOI: 10.1088/1741-2552/aa776c

University of Adelaide media release

How the Dragonfly’s Surprisingly Complex Brain Makes it a Deadly Hunter, Gizmodo

Dragonfly Brains Have ‘Killer Cells’ That Can Predict the Movement of Their Victims – and It Could Lead To Robot Supervision, the Daily Mail

Dragonfly Brains Predict the Path of Their Prey, Science Daily

When Photonics Meets Art

Thank you to Karen Cunningham and the Jam Factory team for hosting Deputy Director Heike Ebendorff-Heidepriem, Tim Zhao, Yunle Wei and Mel McDowall. The team added their own spin to paper weights and glass making and are eager to see the finished products!

This was the initial stages of a collaboration between the Jam Factory and CNBP, to create glass art incorporating nano-particles.

Timely Success to Build High-Performance Clocks

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Dr Chris Perrella (Precision Measurement Group) was recently awarded a  Global Connections Fund Priming Grant. The purpose of the grant is to facilitate collaborations between Australian small to medium sized enterprises (SMEs) and researchers.

This Project will develop a compact high-performance optical clock for ultra-precise timing signals by bringing together Australia’s foremost precision measurement laboratory at the Institute for Photonics and Advanced Sensing (IPAS), the University of Adelaide, and links it to the world’s leading company in optical precision measurement technology, Menlo Systems GmbH.

The compact high-performance optical clock has potential applications in: communication networks; telecommunications; global positioning systems (GPS); and inertial navigation systems.

IPAS Seminar: Commercialisation

Francois DuvenageThis week’s IPAS seminar will be presented by Francois Duvenage, titled “Commercialisation: Are You Ready“.

Francois is a Commercial Manager within Adelaide Enterprise.

Event details:
Thursday, 6th July, 3:30-4:30 pm
Level 2, The Braggs Meeting Room

Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Visit

IPAS researcher Dr Stephen Warren-Smith and project manager, Tim Nelson recently visited Mitsubishi Heavy Industry (MHI) in Nagasaki, Japan.

During the visit, Stephen and Tim met with MHI staff to discuss the progression  of the high temperature fibre sensor project, including delivery of the first prototype.

Included in the visit was a tour of the Mitsubishi History Museum,  with Research Managers Mr Kohei Kawazoe and Mr Shigenari Horie acting as excellent tour guides.

Overall,  the visit was positive, well received and the project continues to make excellent progress against its milestones.

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Kohei Kawazoe, Tim Nelson, Shigenari Horie and Stephen Warren-Smith at the Mitsubishi History Museum.